Boat Yard Blues

Hauling the boat out for a sand-and-paint is something we don’t ever look forward to but this time we had the repairs as well.  And, we’re living on the boat.  Not quite the glamour we’ve been enjoying these past couple months.  It’s really hard to remember not to let anything drain in the sink or not to use the head.  But 10 days, 2 gallons of epoxy, several yards of fiberglass, a gallon of micro-balloons, a million sanding discs, and bottom paint—we’re good as new.

One of my favorite moments came while I was chipping an inspection “excavation” through the micro-balloon fairing to see if the actual hull, 3″ underneath was affected by the rock incident (it wasn’t).  I had a hammer and chisel chipping the fairing which is the consistency of brittle rock.  As the chips were flying, a shipwright came up to me and said:  “uh…..we was wonderin….uh,  just what kind of material is your hull made out of?”.  I had to laugh when I looked down at the pile of “hull” under my ladder.  They must have thought it was a plaster boat.

It was also very cool that so many of you all came by to encourage us and offer help, starting the very first day when Scott S came by with a truck full of tools and know-how (even though we spent most of the night drinkin at the Pour House).  Bob, Mike & Mike thanks for sanding the entire bottom.  And Mikey, the paint job was awesome.   Actually I thought we were off to a shakey start when my friend-since-childhood, John Bailey, came by the boat but didn’t recognize me & my new look.  But in the end it all came back to him.  He & Ann were great local support.

So it actually was kind of fun but we were mighty happy to see her go back in the water.  Now we’re almost ready to head south, but first we head to BI for some last minute provisioning and–you guessed it–boat projects.  And of course a year’s worth of medical care in 3 days with Ev’s place as the recovery room.

Surpisingly light damage to the 10,800 lb keel considering the forces involved.

Surpisingly light damage to the 10,800 lb keel considering the forces involved.

Rebuilding he layers of glass over the reformed lead.

Rebuilding he layers of glass over the reformed lead.

Mike & Mike all suited up for the sanding party. They got the whole bottom prepped in the blistering Port Townsend heat. They're the best!

Mike & Mike all suited up for the sanding party. They got the whole bottom prepped in the blistering Port Townsend heat. They’re the best!

The hull damage before "excavation" to inspect the hull.

The hull damage before “excavation” to inspect the hull.

The spot where the boat rested on the pinnacle that saved her from sliding off the rock. Once we removed the 3" of fairing compound in this spot to inspect the hull, we were relieved to find no stress cracks.

The spot where the boat rested on the pinnacle that saved her from sliding off the rock. Once we removed the 3″ of fairing compound in this spot to inspect the hull, we were relieved to find no stress cracks.

Life in the boat yard--Donna coming "home". We "procured" the rickety stairs from a far corner of the yard so Lucy could quit climbing the 10' extension ladder we originally set up. She amazingly climbed up but coming down....

Life in the boat yard–Donna coming “home”. We “procured” the rickety stairs from a far corner of the yard so Lucy could quit climbing the 10′ extension ladder we originally set up. She amazingly climbed up but coming down….

The Port Townsend boat yard has a lot going on. There was a 10 piece band-all wearing kilts-playing playing Irish, latin, rock, and in this case belly dance music at the brewery--200 yards from our boat.

The Port Townsend boat yard has a lot going on. There was a 10 piece band-all wearing kilts-playing playing Irish, latin, rock, and in this case belly dance music at the brewery–200 yards from our boat.

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